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Street Legal ATVs / UTVs: Regulations in your State

Have fun and be safe at the same time! Make sure you’re up-to-snuff on the ATV/UTV regulations in your home state.

If you’re unsure, check out the following sites for more information. Keep in mind, it’s always best to wear protective gear and operate your ATV/UTV safely. Be sure to pay attention to the lingo used to describe ATV/UTV use. Many sites will refer to ATVs and UTVs as off-road vehicles (ORV) or off-highway vehicles (OHV).

Alabama: ATVs and UTVs not allowed on highways.

Alaska: ATVs and UTVs are for off-road use only, and can be registered to prevent theft. They cannot be driven on a highway.

Arizona: This state requires an annual purchase of an Off-Highway Vehicle Decal. For use on highways, the ATV/UTV has to be registered as if it were a regular vehicle, including insurance, registration fees, and emissions.

Arkansas: ATVs and UTVs must be registered. There is a one-time fee for title, registration, and decal.

California: Riders must have a safety helmet and cannot carry a passenger on public lands unless the ATV is designed for more than one passenger.

Colorado: ATVs and UTVs must be registered with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. You can renew in March and your registration is good through April of the next year. Registration is required at all times.

Connecticut: You can operate your ATV or UTV on your own land if you own it, but it has to be registered if you’re going to be using it anywhere else. A registration plate is required, the ATV/UTV must have a muffler, and it cannot be operated on highways.

Delaware: Registration is required; UTVs and ATVs cannot be operated on public lands or highways and must have permission for private property use.

District of Columbia: ATVs and UTVs cannot be operated on public property, cannot be registered, and cannot be parked on public property.

Florida: If the rider is under 16, they must wear a helmet. ATVs and UTVs cannot be operated on highways, but they can be used by law enforcement officers.

Georgia: ATVs and UTVs are not to be operated on public lands.

Hawaii: There are no ATVs or UTVs allowed in the Kekaha Game Management Area, or on public roads or highways.

Idaho: Owners have to buy a plate to be used on public lands, but ATVs and UTVs cannot be on the highway. When on the road, ATV drivers have to carry a license and insurance.

Illinois: ATVs and UTVs cannot be driven on the street or highway.

Indiana: ATVs/UTVs must be registered.

Iowa: Registration is required.

Kansas: ATVs/UTVs have to be registered, cannot be used on the highway, and have to have lights on it if you want to ride during dark hours. There is no established age limit for riders.

Kentucky: ATVs/UTVs cannot be operated on the highway or public roads. Riders 16 years old and older have to wear a helmet.

Louisiana: Registration required.

Maine: ATVs/UTVs can be registered through Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, but cannot be used on the highway.

Maryland: Title and registration are required.

Massachusetts: If you’re under 18 years old, you have to complete a safety course. ATVs/UTVs cannot be operated on highways and a helmet is required.

Michigan: If you want to use your ATV/UTV on public land, you have to have a decal. ATVs and UTVs cannot be driven on highways.

Minnesota: ATVs and UTVs require registration.

Missouri: ATVs/UTVs cannot be used on the highway and require a title and registration.

Mississippi: There is no safety legislation on ATV/UTV use.

Montana: This state requires registration and ATVs/UTVs can be used on some public roads.

Nebraska: This state requires titling but not registration.

Nevada: Your ATV/UTV doesn’t need to be registered if you’re using it for private land husbandry, but it cannot be used on the highway.

New Hampshire: Registration is required in this state. If you’re 12 years of age or older, you need to either pass a safety course or have a license. Children under 18 years old have to wear a helmet.

New Jersey: Your ATV/UTV doesn’t need a license but it does need to be registered. If you are under 18 years of age, you have to enroll in a safety class. You have to be at least 14 years old to operate your ATV/UTV and also have insurance.

New Mexico: ATVs/UTVs have to be registered. If you’re under 18, the law requires you wear a helmet. You cannot carry a passenger, even if your ATV is designed for multiple passengers.

New York: ATVs/UTVs need to be registered, and registration expires on August 31 each year. Your ATV/UTV also has to be covered by insurance unless you’re operating on your own land. You don’t need a license to operate, but if you’re under 16 years old, you have to be adult-supervised, or the ATV/UTV has to be operated on your own property.

North Carolina: Operators have to be 16 or older.

North Dakota: Registration is required, and your ATV/UTV must have a headlamp and taillamp, muffler, and the unit cannot be operated on the highway.

Ohio: This state requires registration, a headlamp, tail light, brakes, and a muffler.

Oklahoma: This state only requires a title and registration.

Oregon: You need a permit for your ATV if operating it on public land.

Pennsylvania: This state requires registration.

Rhode Island: Your ATV/UTV has to have a headlamp, taillight, muffler, and red rear reflector.

South Carolina: Operators must be over 6 years of age. All riders must wear eye protection and a helmet. If you’re 16 years of age or under, you can’t carry a passenger, and you have to be accompanied by an adult when operating.

South Dakota: ATVs under 200cc and 3-wheeled ATVs cannot be licensed and cannot be operated on park roads. Helmets are required for operators under 18. ATVs/UTVs have to have a horn, headlight, brake light and rearview mirror and require license and insurance to operate.

Tennessee: ATVs/UTVs cannot be driven on highways.

Texas: ATVs/UTVs can’t be driven on public roads unless you are a farmer or rancher and not traveling more than 25 miles. If you drive on public roads, you have to have an orange triangle mounted to an 8-inch pole. Your ATV/UTV must have brakes, a muffler, and a head light and tail light.

Utah: A helmet is required for persons under 18. Operators 8-15 years of age have to take a safety course.

Virginia: ATVs/UTVs have to have a title and cannot be operated on the highway. Riders have to be at least 18 years of age and wear a helmet.

Vermont: Your ATV/UTV has to be registered and have a decal unless operated on private property.

Washington: ATVs/UTVs cannot be operated on the highway.

West Virginia: ATVs/UTVs cannot be operated on the highway. A passenger cannot be under 18 years old if the operator is also under 18. Operators cannot carry a passenger unless allowed by the ATV/UTV’s manufacturer.

Wisconsin: It is legal to carry a passenger only if the ATV/UTV is made for one, but it is certainly not advised. ATVs/UTVs cannot be operated on the highway.

Wyoming: Operators can only carry as many passengers as there are seats, and must possess a driver’s license to operate in the state park.

EverythingPolarisRanger.com has everything you need to make your Polaris Ranger Street Legal.  Shop our Street Legal product selection for your Mid-size Polaris Ranger, Full-size Polaris Ranger, Polaris Ranger Crew or Polaris General.

Remember, always be safe, and have fun!

4 thoughts on “Street Legal ATVs / UTVs: Regulations in your State”

  • I want to make sure I purchase the correct vehicle. I want to use it on my land and the rode.

    Reply
  • What about.... here in Texas, where we are not allowed to drive them on the road.... BUT.... some guys are having the registrated out of state (South Dakota) and having the title changed to a "MV" and getting plates sent to them. Then.... since you don't have to register it here in Texas and it's now legally registered in a different state.... LEAGLY.... as long as we get all the right things...horn, turn indicaters...insurance... would this make it "good to go" in Texas?

    Reply
  • I've found that it's really hard to get solid answers to questions like this.

    Reply
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